VegNews Daily

Human Trash is Taking a Toll on Sea Turtles

Larger numbers of sea turtles are found to be consuming human waste products that end up in the ocean.

A global analysis recently published in the journal Conservation Biology, which looked at 37 separate studies containing data from 1900 to 2011, found that green and leatherback sea turtles are becoming increasingly endangered by waste products. According to the United Nations Environment Programme, nearly 6.4 million tons of debris from humans ends up in marine eco-systems. Scientists believe that the two types of turtles are more likely to eat the waste products due to their dietary proclivities and that greater international efforts must be taken to keep oceans clean. “Our results indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris,” wrote the experts in Conservation Biology. “To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level.”

Another UK Veg Fest Draws Massive Crowds

More than 13,000 attendees convened on Vegfest UK Bristol, braving rain and wind for a chance to get their hands on vegan finds.
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Brazilian State Bans Cosmetic Animal Testing

Pará, Brazil's second largest state, became the fourth city in the country to ban testing of beauty products on animals.
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Vegan Product Labels Are Fastest Growing in Western Europe

A market trend report predicts significant growth for products labeled as vegan in $709 billion ethical-label global market.
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Bon Appétit Offers Advice to Help Veg-Curious Go Vegan

Popular food publication identifies five common mistakes that keep people from staying vegan.
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Baileys Releases Vegan Irish Cream

Almond milk-based beverage Almande is Baileys foray into growing dairy-free market.
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This Week on VegNews TV: The secret to these delightful sweet treats is white beans! Aylin Erman shows you how to make these simple blondies.

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