VegNews Daily

Diesel Emissions Linked to Bee Population Decline

Chemicals in diesel fuel may be preventing bees from using their sense of smell to find flower nectar and pollinate plants.

Research conducted by the University of Southampton has revealed that diesel emissions may be contributing to colony bee collapse disorder by inhibiting the insects from using their sense of smell to detect the nectar in flowers. During the study, scientists exposed bees to a floral scent that triggered their normal nectar-gathering behavior; when the scents were mixed with a chemical component found in diesel fuel, the insects were found to no longer be able to detect the flower smell. “A bee has far poorer recognition of an altered floral mix,” says study co-author Tracey Newman. “The bee needs to learn the unadulterated version, and if the bee has learned it, it will then struggle with the version that has been chemically altered.”

Biggest Airlift in History Returns 33 Circus Lions to Africa

"Operation Spirit of Freedom" to take 33 lions from 10 circuses in Peru and Colombia back to their native land in Africa.
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Innovative Vegan Restaurants Open Outside of Sydney

Sydney’s Bondi suburb is now home to a “Znickers mylkshake”-making sweet shop and an entirely milk-free coffee shop.
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Los Angeles Bans Sale of Bred Cats, Dogs, and Rabbits

City pet stores will now promote adoption of rescued animals instead of profiting from breeder-supplied cats, dogs, and rabbits.
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Researchers Create Cruelty-Free Leather Made from Kombucha

A mixture of fiber from the fermented tea, sugar, vinegar, bacteria, and yeast yields a new material that some hope can replace animal-based leather.
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Toronto to Get First Vegan Food Truck

The Vegan Extremist will be hitting the streets of Toronto in May to serve Indian and Thai-inspired dishes.
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This Week on VegNews TV: The secret to these delightful sweet treats is white beans! Aylin Erman shows you how to make these simple blondies.

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