VegNews Daily

Kelly Osbourne Blogs About Antibiotics in Poultry

The celebrity singer says that the antibiotics used in chicken and eggs are making her reconsider her dinner options.

Scientists have alerted the public for years that the factory farming industry’s rampant use of antibiotics is responsible for the development of super-strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Now, celebrities may be echoing the scientists’ warning—recently, singer Kelly Osbourne blogged about the danger of consuming poultry and eggs on her website, in which she noted how studies (and a personal testimony in Vogue) have shown that the animal products may be responsible for antibiotic-resistant urinary tract infections. Osbourne is not alone in her worries—influential fashion blogger Bryanboy, who has more than 512,000 Twitter followers, recently wrote on the social media website: “Ever since I read that Vogue article about antibiotics being injected into chicken eggs, I’ve replaced my egg white omelets with oatmeal.” Osbourne also noted in her article that she is “definitely reconsidering having poultry.”

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