Canada Ends Pesticide Testing on Beagles

Cruel practice of exposing the trusting dogs to chemicals has finally been banned in Canada.

After successful negotiations with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), Health Canada decided to drop its year-long requirement to test pesticides on dogs. The cruel practice required that dogs—typically beagles because of their docile nature—were to be fed food-related pesticides for one year, then killed and dissected in order to study toxicity levels. Typically, each test would require up to 64 dogs to undergo experiments for an entire year, a practice that PETA deemed unnecessary since toxicity results are learned within the first 90 days. Similar pesticide testing requirements were banned in the United States in 2007 and PETA continues its efforts to eliminate the existing testing requirements in countries such as Japan and South Korea, offering the solution of cell cultures and computer modeling in place of live animals.

More News

Study Links Processed Meat Consumption and Migraines

University of California San Diego finds that nitrates found in processed meats may be connected to severe headaches.
Read More »

Red Meat Increases Tumor Formation

New study shows that eating red meat, particularly pig organs, can increase risks of tumor formations.
Read More »

Spain Overturns Bullfighting Ban

Despite decreasing interest in the cruel sport, Spanish court reverses law in Catalan region.
Read More »

Egg Replacement Market to Surpass $1.5 Billion by 2026

Demand for vegan egg substitutes in baked goods and mayonnaise are the driving forces behind the growth of the lucrative animal-free ingredient.
Read More »

Princeton Physicists Solve Oreo Cream Mystery

Scientists accurately predict which side of the cookie, when twisted, will have more cream.
Read More »

This Week on VegNews TV: The secret to these delightful sweet treats is white beans! Aylin Erman shows you how to make these simple blondies.

More Videos »