Living Near Livestock Ups Staph Infection Risk

University researchers find that people who live near livestock grounds are more likely to contract antibiotic-resistant staph infections.


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Johns Hopkins University researchers recently reported that individuals who live near livestock are more likely to contract MRSA, a staph infection that does not respond to antibiotics. The researchers found that even if people living near livestock did not come into direct contact with animals, they were still at high risk for MRSA. The study analyzed nasal swabs from 27 people in The Netherlands who had livestock-related MRSA—specifically called LA-MRSA—and compared those swabs with 60 swabs from people with other types. After analyzing all data, the researchers found that 12 of the 27 people with LA-MRSA did not come into contact with any farm animals, and that many LA-MRSA patients resided in areas near livestock grounds. The researchers gather that when excessive farm waste builds, the LA-MRSA strain is spread through the air.