New Study: Vegan Diet Halts Breast Cancer Tumors

Cancer cells starve when methionine, mostly found in meat, is removed from the diet.


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A recent study suggests that a vegan diet may halt the growth of tumors in triple-negative breast cancer patients. The research explains how the amino acid, methionine—present in fish, meat, some nuts and legumes, and nearly absent in fruits and vegetables—fuels tumor cells. The study, conducted at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and led by Vincent Cyrns, found tumor cells to be sensitive to methionine depletion. As triple-negative cancer cells lack receptors for common hormone and chemotherapy treatments, this finding presents a dietary option capable of providing patients some relief. Cyrns stated, “What’s particularly exciting about our findings is that they suggest that a dietary intervention can increase the effectiveness of a targeted cancer therapy.”