Tiger Populations on the Rise for First Time in 100 Years

Tiger Populations on the Rise for First Time in 100 Years

New data shows promising figures for the future of a once near-extinct species.


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For the first time in nearly 100 years, there is a rise in the wild tiger population, with nearly 700 more of the big cats alive today than there were in 2010, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) reports. Data from national tiger surveys have found an estimated 3,890 tigers now exist in the wild as compared to 3,200 six years ago. “This is a pivotal step in the recovery of one of the world’s most endangered and iconic species,” Ginette Hemley, senior vice president of wildlife conservation at WWF, said. “Together with governments, local communities, philanthropists, and other NGOs, we’ve begun to reverse the trend in the century-long decline of tigers.” Government-enforced protections from poaching are credited for the rise in numbers, with India, Russia, Nepal, and Bhutan among the countries showing the most significant population increases.

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