Later this month, fast-food chain Burger King will test plant-based Impossible Pork in the form of a sausage patty inside a “Croissan’wich” at 139 select locations in Savannah, GA; Lansing, MI; Albuquerque, NM; Montgomery, AL; and Springfield, IL. The new, limited-time Impossible Croissan’wich will be made with dairy cheese, chicken eggs, and non-vegan croissants.

Today, plant-based food company Impossible Foods unveiled Impossible Pork, its second plant-based meat product, during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES)—the world’s biggest technology trade show—in Las Vegas, NV. The ingredients of Impossible Pork are similar to that of the Impossible Burger but with different ratios of fat, a more pork-like texture, and less soy leghemoglobin (“heme”)—the ingredient responsible for the “meaty” taste of Impossible Foods’ products. “The launch of pork is a pivotal moment for us for at least a couple of reasons,” Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown said in a video announcing the product. “Beef is popular around the world. But in many cultures, the most popular, and familiar, and common dishes use pork as the main source of meat. So for us to have an impact in those markets, pork was a necessity.” 

In May, pizza chain Little Caesars was the first to test Impossible Pork as a topping at several of its locations in Ft. Myers, FL; Albuquerque, NM; and Yakima, WA. Impossible Foods intends to disrupt the pork industry with its new plant-based meat the way it did with the Impossible Burger, which is available at all 7,200 Burger King locations as part of the Impossible Whopper. 

Last year at CES, Impossible Foods debuted an improved version of its flagship Impossible Burger, the Impossible Burger 2.0. Technology authorities Digital Trends and Engadget named the new formulation the Top Tech Winner and Best of the Best at the show, which typically focuses on non-food-related innovations. In addition to pork, Impossible Foods is working to develop plant-based versions of other animal foods, including fish, shrimp, and dairy, to fulfill its mission of replacing all animal foods with viable plant-based alternatives by 2035.

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